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How to Travel with Your Friends (and Not Hate Each Other Afterwards)

While most of travelling is fun and relaxing it can also be pretty stressful, and you usually tend to take out your stress on whoever you’re travelling with. If you’re with bae you at least get to have make-up sex after an argument, but travel fights with your friends are a little harder to get over.

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Here are a few tips for going on holiday with friends (and still being friends by the end of your trip):

Choose your friends wisely

It might seem like a great idea to go road-tripping with that girl you always have the best nights out with, but what’s she like when you’re not partying together? When choosing a travel companion, pick someone who you have been in a high-pressure situation with before and who you consistently have a good time with. This way you won’t find out too late that they get really mean when things don’t go right.

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Don’t mix money and friendship

There’s something extra sour about fighting with a friend when it’s about money. Have a group wallet that everyone contributes an equal amount to that you take money out for things like entrance costs, joint meals, petrol, etc. Or if you don’t want to deal with cash then make everyone download Splitwise. It’s an app where you can log every expense, and at the end of the trip you’ll know exactly who owes who what and why. Also, talk budget before you set off. It’s better to know beforehand if your friend wants to eat out all the time while you were thinking more along the lines of peanut-butter sandwiches for every meal.

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Make sure you’re on the same page

It’s important to be extra comunicative so that there aren’t any unpleasant surprises along the way. You might have both agreed on going to the Kruger, but you were envisioning wine and sunsets while your friend was thinking more 10-hour game rides every day. While planning, be really explicit with what you both want from your holiday. If you guys have totally different visions, that’s fine, you can work around it, but it’s better to know sooner than later.

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Spend time apart

Don’t wait until you’re sick of each other to take some time apart. Set aside a few hours a day where you go off and do your own thing. It’ll give you all a chance to miss each other a bit and have some new experiences to share when you meet up later on. Travelling together is a constant compromise because it’s not possible that you’ll want to do the same things as each other all of the time. This time apart can be your opportunity to do the activities your friends aren’t so keen on (so you don’t miss out and resent them for it).

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Plan, plan, plan

Being spontaneous sounds fun and carefree but in practice usually means you sitting around wasting time while you try to decide what to do. In the weeks leading up to the trip, create a Google Doc that everyone can contribute to while they procrastinate at work dreaming about the upcoming holiday. You’ll end up with an itinerary that everyone has had an equal say in and a clear idea of what to expect.

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Discuss your travel style

Some people are happy to walk all day and stay in hostel dorm rooms, while others insist on Uber-ing everywhere and a four-star hotel room. Chat about your travel styles beforehand, and be honest with each other. There’s no shame in being someone who can’t fall asleep unless they’re alone in a double bed – it’s just better to know this stuff before you end up grumpy AF because you’re stuck sharing a single bed with your easygoing and cheapskate BFF.

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