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Be a Day-Dream Believer

By harnessing your daydreams you can improve your career, your social skills and even your personal relationships. Believe it

By harnessing your daydreams you can improve your career, your social skills and even your personal relationships. Believe it!

Head in the clouds
Psychologists and neuroscientists estimate that we spend between 15% and 50% of our waking hours daydreaming. And although wool-gathering has always been given a bad rap, research conducted by the University of British Columbia in Canada and published in Proceeds Of The National Academy Of Sciences shows that our brains are much more active when we’re daydreaming.

Devoted To Distracted

Daydreams can be described as waking fantasies and are most often unrelated to the individual’s immediate environment or situation, says Durban counselling psychologist Rakhi Beekrum. “Daydreams are usually pleasant and often focus on wishes and desires,” she says. According to Beekrum, the study conducted by the University of British Columbia is very valuable in dispelling the myth that daydreaming is unproductive. “This study shows that, although daydreaming takes our focus off tasks at hand, it is useful in helping us work through problems in our lives”.

Daydream achievers

To make the most of sour daydreams and use them positively in our daily existence we need to start becoming more aware of them. Daydreaming is something that comes naturally to us – the skill comes in becoming conscious of these daydreams and capitalizing on the creative insights and ideas they may contain, says Beekrum. So pay attention the next time you’ve got your head stuck in a big fluffy cloud – it may get you in trouble or it may just be the most productive and creative thing you do today.


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